Chalazion Pediatric Care Plan

By David Shafran, MD
Medically reviewed
January 18, 2021

What is a Chalazion?

A chalazion is a rubbery, non-painful round lesion on the eyelid. The condition is caused by a blocked oil gland.

Sometimes a stye will turn into a chalazion if the infection disappears but the lesion remains. Whereas styes are red and painful, chalazions usually cause no symptoms beyond the lesion itself.

Chalazion Diagnosis & Treatment

Doctors typically diagnose a chalazion via physical exam.

All you can do is manage the chalazion. Most resolve on their own within a few weeks. Managing the condition mainly includes using warm compresses on the eye.

It is worth noting that antibiotics cannot treat a chalazion.

If the chalazion doesn’t go away on its own your child’s provider may send your child to an eye specialist to have it removed.

Check in with K If…

  • You have general questions about your child’s condition
  • You want general followup for your child
  • You have questions about supportive care
  • Your child’s symptoms don’t go away after treatment but are not alarming

See a Doctor in Person If…

  • The chalazion grows or becomes red or painful
  • The chalazion doesn’t go away after 3-4 weeks
  • If your child experiences any eye pain
  • If your child experiences a change in vision
K Health articles are all written and reviewed by MDs, PhDs, NPs, or PharmDs and are for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute and should not be relied on for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.

David Shafran, MD

Dr. Shafran is a board-certified pediatrics physician. He joins K Health from the Cleveland Clinic, where he led a pediatrics practice and completed a fellowship in transplant ethics. He has completed multiple fellowships, including one in pediatric nephrology at Rainbow, Babies & Children's University Hospitals. He received his medical degree from the Sackler School of Medicine in Tel Aviv and completed his medical residency at the Jacobi Medical Center.