When to See a Doctor for Hemorrhoids

By Craig Sorkin, DNP, APN
Medically reviewed checkmarkMedically reviewed
September 23, 2022

Though uncomfortable, hemorrhoids are common conditions and are rarely life-threatening or dangerous. Still, having hemorrhoids can affect your day-to-day life, making tasks like sitting, moving, or going to the bathroom particularly painful or difficult.

Most cases of hemorrhoids clear up on their own within a few days. But if you notice blood in your stool or experience pain that lasts longer than a week, it’s important to reach out to your healthcare provider for guidance.

When to See a Doctor for Hemorrhoids

In most cases, hemorrhoids can be treated at home by drinking water, eating foods that are high in fiber, and taking a stool softener. But if you have any of the below, you should reach out to your provider for care: 

  • Symptoms that persist after one week of at-home treatment
  • Bleeding from your rectum
  • Intense pain in the anus
Have hemorrhoids? Chat with a medical provider through K Health.
Get started

What are Hemorrhoids?

Hemorrhoids, also referred to as piles, are swollen and inflamed veins around your anus and in your lower rectum. When the blood flow through these veins becomes disrupted, it can cause blood to pool and the area to swell, forming small lumps known as hemorrhoids.

Anyone can get hemorrhoids, but they’re most common in:

  • Adults aged 50 and older
  • Pregnant people
  • People who strain during bowel movements
  • People who sit on the toilet for extended periods of time
  • People with chronic constipation or diarrhea
  • People who regularly lift heavy objects

Types of hemorrhoids

There are two types of hemorrhoids:

  • External hemorrhoids: Swollen and inflamed veins that form under the skin around the anus.  
  • Internal hemorrhoids: Swollen and inflamed veins that form in the lining of the anus and lower rectum.

Common Symptoms

The symptoms of hemorrhoids can vary depending on what type of hemorrhoids you have. 

Common symptoms of external hemorrhoids include:

  • Anal itching
  • Hard, tender lumps around the anus
  • Anal ache or pain, particularly when sitting
  • Symptoms that get worse when straining, rubbing, or cleaning the area

Common symptoms of internal hemorrhoids include:

  • Rectal bleeding (bright red blood that appears on toilet paper, in stool, or in the toilet bowl)
  • Prolapse – a hemorrhoid that has fallen through the anal opening (these are usually not painful)

Medical Treatment for Hemorrhoids

If at-home treatment fails to improve your symptoms within one week, you should reach out to your provider. Depending on the state of your hemorrhoids, your provider may recommend an in-office or outpatient treatment, including:

  • Rubber band ligation: This is an in-office procedure used to treat bleeding or prolapsing internal hemorrhoids. Rubber band ligation works to cut off blood supply to the hemorrhoid, causing it to shrivel and fall off, usually within one week.
  • Sclerotherapy: An injection performed in-office used to cut off blood supply to internal hemorrhoids, which also causes them to shrink eventually.
  • Infrared photocoagulation: An in-office procedure in which a provider uses infrared light directed at an internal hemorrhoid. The infrared light cuts off blood supply, shrinking the hemorrhoid.
  • Electrocoagulation: An in-office procedure in which a provider sends an electric current into an internal hemorrhoid which causes scar tissue to form, cuts off blood supply, and ultimately shrinks the hemorrhoid.
  • Hemorrhoidectomy: An outpatient procedure used to remove large external hemorrhoids and prolapsing internal hemorrhoids that do not respond to other treatments.
  • Hemorrhoid stapling: An outpatient surgery in which a stapling tool is used to remove internal hemorrhoid tissue and pull a prolapsing internal hemorrhoid back into the anus.

At-Home Treatment for Hemorrhoids

There are many ways to treat your hemorrhoids at home. Diet and lifestyle play important role in hemorrhoid management.

At-home hemorrhoid treatment strategies include:

  • Eating a diet high in fiber
  • Taking an over-the-counter (OTC) stool softener
  • Drinking plenty of water and non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated beverages
  • Practice not straining during bowel movements
  • Avoid sitting on the toilet for long periods of time
  • Taking OTC pain relievers, like acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, or aspirin
  • Taking a sitz bath several times a day to relieve pain (sit in a tub of warm water)
  • Taking OTC hemorrhoid creams, ointments, or suppositories (if symptoms don’t improve within one week, reach out to your healthcare provider)
Have hemorrhoids? Chat with a medical provider through K Health.
Get started

Prevention

To try to prevent hemorrhoids from forming, you can:

  • Eat a high-fiber diet
  • Drink plenty of water and non-alcoholic and non-caffeinated beverages
  • Don’t strain during bowel movements
  • Don’t sit on the toilet for long periods of time
  • Avoid heavy lifting

How K Health Can Help

Did you know you can get affordable virtual primary care with K Health? Check your symptoms, explore conditions and treatments, and if needed, text with a healthcare provider in minutes. K Health’s AI-powered app is HIPAA compliant and is based on 20 years of clinical data.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are hemorrhoids ever an emergency?
Most cases of hemorrhoids can be treated at home. But it’s important to reach out to your healthcare provider if you notice blood in your stool or if you’re experiencing severe pain that has not improved with at-home care. You should also seek treatment if you notice a prolapsed hemorrhoid—an internal hemorrhoid that has fallen through the anal opening.
Should I go to the doctor with hemorrhoids?
You should speak with a healthcare provider if you notice blood in your stool or if you’re having symptoms that aren’t improving within one week. Otherwise, most cases of hemorrhoids can be treated at home.
What happens if hemorrhoids go untreated?
Most hemorrhoids resolve on their own within a few days or one week. But if your symptoms fail to improve or if they get worse, you should contact your medical provider. Possible complications of hemorrhoids include blood clots in external hemorrhoids, skin tags, infection, strangulated hemorrhoids, and anemia.

K Health articles are all written and reviewed by MDs, PhDs, NPs, or PharmDs and are for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute and should not be relied on for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.

Craig Sorkin, DNP, APN

Craig Sorkin, DNP, APN is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner with over 15 years experience. He received his Undergraduate and Graduate degrees from William Paterson University and his doctoral degree from Drexel University. He has spent his career working in the Emergency Room and Primary Care. The last 6 years of his career have been dedicated to the field of digital medicine. He has created departments geared towards this specialized practice as well as written blogs and a book about the topic.

K Health logo (used on certain page templates)