Home Remedies That Provide Relief from Gout

By Zina Semenovskaya, MD
Medically reviewed checkmarkMedically reviewed
November 29, 2021

You may not know how rough toe pain can be until you have a bout of gout, a common form of arthritis that causes sudden and severe attacks of pain, swelling, and redness in the joints.

While gout can theoretically affect any joint, it’s most known for causing sharp and intense pain in the big toe—in fact, people often report waking in the middle of the night feeling like their big toe is burning. 

Gout is caused by an accumulation of urate crystals, which form when people have too much uric acid in their blood.

The body normally produces uric acid when it breaks down substances called purines, which are already found in the body but also in certain foods and drinks, such as red meat, certain fish, and beer and cocktails.

This buildup of uric acid can cause sharp urate crystals to form in tissue, which results in needle-like pain known as a “gout attack.”

While gout isn’t necessarily cause for major medical concern, if left untreated, it can result in joint damage or lead to kidney stones.

Because it can be very painful, you will want to treat it right away, and prevent it from recurring as much as possible.

While you should always seek medical attention for new, severe pain, there are also ways to relieve gout pain at home. 

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Home Remedies for Gout Relief

There are several prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs that can help with gout flare-ups.

For example, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen can help reduce inflammation and pain during a gout attack.

If you’re prone to gout attacks, a doctor may also prescribe a medication to decrease the uric acid in your body, such as allopurinol. 

If you’re at home and in severe pain—or if you want to reduce your chances of a gout attack—there are a few evidence-backed natural remedies for gout relief, from foods to lifestyle changes. 

If, for some reason, your gout gets worse or home remedies just aren’t cutting it, don’t hesitate to see a health care provider or chat with a K doctor, who can help you manage the pain and teach you how to prevent future gout attacks. 

Without further ado, here are some of the most common home remedies for gout. 

Foods That Help Treat Gout

There are several common foods that are known to help your body excrete uric acid, thereby helping to alleviate pain from gout flares. 

Cherries

Cherry juice is a common home remedy for gout.

According to one study from 2011, drinking eight ounces of 100% tart cherry juice every day for four weeks can significantly lower the amount of uric acid in people’s blood.

Cherries also contain compounds called anthocyanins, which are naturally anti-inflammatory and can ease swelling associated with gout. 

To prevent a gout flare-up with cherries, the Arthritis Foundation recommends eating a handful of tart cherries or drinking a glass of tart cherry juice each day.

You can find either at most grocery stores. 

Apples

An apple a day may not keep the doctor away, but eating apples can help naturally lower uric acid levels and in turn prevent gout attacks.

That’s because apples are high in fiber, a nutrient that absorbs uric acid from the bloodstream so the body can eliminate it.

Apples also contain malic acid, which can neutralize negative effects of uric acid that’s already in the body. 

If your goal is to reduce the odds of a gout attack, steer clear of juice, which often has added sugar that can have the opposite effect on uric acid levels.

Plus, juice doesn’t contain the fiber from an apple, which is what’s most helpful for gout.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus, a flowering plant, has been shown to increase uric acid levels in the urine (a byproduct of removing uric acid from the body).

One animal study found hibiscus could be effective in lowering uric acid levels, which could theoretically reduce the risk of gout.

To prevent gout attacks at home, try drinking hibiscus tea.

You can find hibiscus tea at grocery stores or make your own tea with dried hibiscus.

Simply steep the herbs in hot water for 10 or so minutes. 

Dandelion 

Dandelion is another tea you can make at home to potentially stave off gout attacks.

People often use dandelion tea and extract to help with kidney function, which could in turn help the body remove excess uric acid.

There’s not much scientific evidence supporting dandelion as a gout remedy, but one animal study found dandelion can decrease uric acid levels. 

You can find dandelion tea at many grocery and health food stores.

If you decide to try a supplement or dandelion extract, talk to a doctor first and, as always, follow the instructions on the label.

Celery

Celery is commonly touted as a home remedy for urinary tract issues, and celery seed extract has been recommended as a home remedy for gout.

That may be because celery seed contains luteolin, a compound that can help to reduce uric acid levels.

Antioxidants found in celery can also help to reduce inflammation associated with arthritis, including gout.

While there’s no direct scientific evidence suggesting celery is an effective way to prevent gout, it can’t hurt to munch on a healthy snack that’s low in purine.

If you decide to try celery seed extract as a supplement, talk to your doctor first and follow the instructions on the product label.

Ginger

Ginger is known to help with digestion and ease nausea, but it can also help with inflammation, including gout.

One animal study, for example, found ginger lowered uric acid levels in subjects who consumed ginger internally.

Another study conducted in humans concluded applying ginger as a paste or compress to gout flare-up can reduce pain. 

Creating your own ginger compress is relatively easy.

Start by boiling a tablespoon of fresh, grated ginger, then soak a clean cloth in the mixture and apply it to the affected joint when it’s fully cool for up to 30 minutes.

You can also cook your own food with ginger to see if it helps reduce inflammation, or drink a cup of ginger tea, which you should be able to find at the store. 

Bananas

Bananas in moderation may help prevent gout because they contain high levels of potassium, a mineral your organs need to function properly (including your kidney).

Bananas also contain a decent amount of fiber, which may help remove uric acid from the body. 

One banana per day should be enough to reap any benefits they offer—just avoid eating too many, because they contain fructose, which, in large quantities, can actually trigger gout.

Lifestyle Changes That Help Treat Gout

Gout can happen to anyone, and it’s not always possible to prevent it, especially because some people seem to be predisposed to developing gout.

However, certain lifestyle factors can help your kidneys get rid of excess uric acid and decrease the odds that you’ll experience a gout attack.

Here are a few simple lifestyle shifts to try.

Get enough sleep 

An overall healthy lifestyle is crucial to preventing inflammation, including gout attacks.

Daily routines such as exercise, a nutritious diet, and getting enough sleep can help your body fight inflammation and in turn prevent high levels of uric acid from building up in your body. 

If possible, try to go to bed and wake up at a regular time, making sure to get at least 7 hours of sleep per night.

It’s also helpful to avoid caffeine late in the day and moderate your alcohol intake (especially since alcohol is a known risk factor for gout).

Stress-reduction techniques like yoga, mindfulness, meditation, and psychotherapy can also help you sleep.

If you find yourself experiencing difficulty falling or staying asleep on a regular basis, talk to your health care provider or a K doctor about how you can improve your sleep. 

Stay hydrated

Drinking enough water is a simple way to help your kidneys flush out any excess uric acid in your body.

There’s no hard-and-fast rule for water intake.

Keep a glass or bottle of water with you throughout the day and sip it frequently.

If your urine is light or clear, you’re likely hydrated enough (and you hopefully won’t have a gout attack). 

Topical cold or hot application

Once a gout attack hits, try applying ice or heat to the affected area to reduce the pain.

Cold has been shown in studies to reduce swelling and inflammation associated with gout, while heat can reduce pain by bringing more blood to the affected area. 

Alternate with an ice pack and hot compress throughout the day as needed.

Just make sure to cover the cold and hot compresses so they don’t directly touch your skin.

Eliminate diet triggers

Food and drink can play a big role in a gout attack, so pay attention to your nutrition if you want to prevent one.

If possible, cut back on your red meat intake, and avoid shellfish and anchovies, sardines, trout, and tuna, which are all high in purines.

It also helps to moderate your alcohol intake, particularly if you know that it’s a trigger for you.

If you do decide to consume alcoholic beverages, aim for a glass of wine instead of a cocktail or beer, both of which can significantly increase the amount of uric acid in your body. 

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Nonprescription Medications For Gout

If home remedies aren’t cutting it, your provider may recommend you take an over-the-counter medication to manage your pain.

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) and naproxen sodium (Aleve) can help to reduce inflammation associated with gout, and in turn, reduce the pain, swelling, and redness of a gout attack.

Your health care provider can recommend the best nonprescription medication for you to manage gout flare ups, and if necessary, suggest a prescription medication.

How K Health Can Help

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the fastest way to get rid of gout?
While it may not be possible to entirely get rid of gout, there's a lot you can do to lessen the pain. Try taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, drinking plenty of water, and eating some of the foods which are known to help the body get rid of excess uric acid.
What gives relief from gout?
Gout can be painful, but luckily, there’s a lot you can do to relieve that pain. Over-the-counter pain relievers, such as NSAIDs, can reduce the redness, swelling, pain, and inflammation that are associated with gout. You can also try eating foods that help the body expel uric acid, and drink plenty of water in the process. To prevent gout, try implementing some of the lifestyle remedies above, or talk to your doctor.
How do you flush uric acid out of your body?
Drinking plenty of water is probably the best way to help your body flush excess uric acid. Aim to stay hydrated on a regular basis, and boost your water intake when you’re drinking alcohol or eating red meat and shellfish to avoid a gout attack.

K Health articles are all written and reviewed by MDs, PhDs, NPs, or PharmDs and are for informational purposes only. This information does not constitute and should not be relied on for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.

Zina Semenovskaya, MD

Dr. Semenovskaya specializes in emergency medicine, and received her medical degree from Weill Cornell Medical College. She is currently the medical director at Remote Emergency Medicine Consulting, LLC and splits her time working clinically as an emergency medicine attending in California and Alaska. She is the first of our doctors to be fluent in Russian.